RECIPE: Easter Biscuits by Sue Stoneman


If you’re not a fan of Hot Cross Buns, you might like these Easter Biscuits. They are easy to make – great to involve the little people as they are fairly easy and quick to make.  Use any shaped cutters but they look great if you have any Easter cutters in your baking cupboard.  They make great gifts – put some into clear bags and give to relatives and friends.  You might wish to double the recipe!  This is my favourite recipe by James Martin.

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Makes 20-25 biscuits

What you need:
110g caster sugar, plus extra for dusting
110g butter, softened at room temperature
1 large egg, separated
225g plain flour, sieved
good pinch mixed spice
55g currants
30g candied peel
3 tbsp milk

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What to do:
1. Preheat the oven 160C/325F/Gas 3. Line a baking tray with greaseproof paper.
2. Cream the butter and sugar together in a bowl until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg yolk until well combined.

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Using a stand mixer or hand held electric mixer makes this part of the process relatively easy.  You could use a wooden spoon to beat the mixture.

3. Fold the flour into the mixture, then stir in the mixed spice, currants  and candied peel.  I used sultanas as I didn’t have any currants in my cupboard. You could use mixed dried fruit or cranberries.  The reason currants are preferred is that they are smaller and makes cutting out the shapes easier as you’re less likely to cut through any of the larger pieces of dried fruit. Stir in enough milk to form a stiff dough.  You don’t want it too wet nor sticky.  You might not need to use all the milk.

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4. Roll the dough out onto a floured surface and cut out the biscuits with a cutter. Place onto the baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes.

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5. Remove the biscuits from the oven, brush with the reserved egg white, sprinkle with sugar and return to the oven for 5-10 minutes, or until pale golden-brown.

6. Remove the biscuits from the tray and set aside to cool on a wire rack.

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Tip:  Grate the zest of an orange or lemon when adding the dried fruit for added flavour.

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